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Ginger cookie, triple ginger cookie, ginger three ways cookie

Ginger Cookies, Three Ways

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Delicious, crinkled ginger three ways cookies.

A good friend of mine had hipped me to my winning ginger snap/molasses spice cookie recipe and for me, that meant the end of tweaking.  Even though I am a chronic recipe tinkerer, when something gets high marks, is asked for repeatedly, I leave it alone.  Until another good friend suggested that there was a cookie of equal, if not greater merit by the Canyon Ranch called Triple Ginger Cookies.  I made it and though I must say it was a very, very, very good cookie, I was missing some of the flavors from the other cookie that I loved, namely cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves.   So just for fun, I added them in to see whether or not it would make it better.  It did.  Know what else made it better? Full-fat cream cheese (the original recipe calls for low-fat cream cheese, which is gross).

Of course, playing with ingredients and fat means adjusting the baking time.  The original recipe calls for a 9 minute baking time, but I found using small balls (1 inch scoop as a go-by), I needed about 16 minutes to get these to the right texture.   Now that’s a subjective matter based on whether or not you like them pudding-soft or or teeth-breakingly crisp, or somewhere in between.
Ingredients
  • ⅓ cup unsalted butter
  • ⅔ cream cheese
  • 1½ cups brown sugar
  • 1 egg yolk
  • ⅓ cup black strap molasses
  • 1½ cups all-purpose flour
  • ¼ tsp himalayan sea salt
  • ¾ cup white whole-wheat flour
  • 1½ tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp nutmeg
  • ½ tsp ground cloves
  • ½ tsp ground ginger
  • 2 Tbsp peeled and minced fresh ginger root
  • ½ cup minced crystallized ginger
  • 1/2 cup sugar, for rolling.
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, cream butter, cream cheese and sugar on low speed with an electric mixer. Add egg yolk and molasses and mix on low until just combined.
  3. Combine dry ingredients, whisk thoroughly.
  4. Add to wet ingredients.
  5. Mix briefly by hand, and a brief mix with the stand mixer (I find this is necessary).
  6. If possible, wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or over night.
  7. Using your hands or smallest scoop, create balls.
  8. Dip and roll in sugar.
  9. Add to a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper.
  10. Bake for about 15 minutes.  Cookies should have a crinkled look and be relatively flat.
  11. Cool for five minutes and serve.

Crazily Addictive Banana Pancakes

Every once in a while my daughter, who is the lieutenant chef, has a special request, and of course, within reason, we try to accommodate it.  This morning was Banana Pancakes.   Cliche, right?  We often get them at Harry’s in West Roxbury (where they are to die for) but that does require getting up and getting dressed. We found a great recipe at Kitchen Treaty that we played with. I knew it would be good because it involves buttermilk.  The recipe had a few revolutionary suggestions.  One was to let the batter sit after combining it, so the rising agent (baking powder) can do its job. Brilliant!  Pancakes were definitely the fluffiest banana pancakes we have ever created.  Also, the suggestion of using a scooper was a mind-blowing improvement that I never thought of, and significantly aided the process.    As a postscript you should know that there is never anything in my house but real maple syrup and this is for two reasons.  One, I live in New England, so of course great (and super-expensive) maple syrup is always available.  Two, “Pancake Syrup” is a horrifying fraud that aside is likely to negatively affect your health with its ingredients.

pancakes, banana pancakes, fluffy banana pancakes

Fluffy, hot, delicious and just-slightly crispy banana pancakes are so good you will be sorry you made them.

In any case, this is a good morning activity, but the clean up was extensive (and not yet done as of this writing).

INGREDIENTS:
  • 2 cups buttermilk
  • 2 bananas (if you only have green ones, you can add 1/4 table banana extract)
  • 2 large eggs (room temperature)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter  (room-temperature soft or melted and cooled)
  • 1  tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Two shakes of cinnamon
  • 1/16 teaspoon butterscotch extract
  • Powdered sugar or maple syrup (or both) for topping

DIRECTIONS:

  1. First assess your bananas– if they are green-ish, like mine, we found you could submerge them in hot water for about 5 minutes to make them softer and slightly sweeter.   That’s helpful, but not a total solution.   Because greenish bananas are less sweet and have less flavor, we added about 1/4th teaspoon of banana extract.  Also, if you get a hot buttered pan and you can get a ‘crisp’ exterior, it will bring out more of the banana flavor.
  2. Add your bananas to the bowl of a standing mixer. This can ensure a good mashing.  If you have anger issues, you can mash them separately and later.  Add the buttermilk, eggs (one at a time), butter, vanilla, banana extract if using and butterscotch.
  3. In a separate bowl, sift and add the the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon. Whisk together to combine.
  4. Add dry ingredients to your wet one.  Mix gently.
  5. Let the batter rest for about 5 minutes. You’ll see bubbles.  (Depending on your pan’s size, you can likely make a test pancake, and by the time it’s done and eaten you’ll be ready to make the rest)
  6. Melt butter in a large frying plan. Using an ice cream scoop, I was able to do two at a time.  I feel it’s necessary to wipe-dry the pan between pancakes because it facilitates better pancakes and reduces the chance of burning the butter.  When the pancakes bubble, flip them over, and then after about 35 seconds, take them out.
  7. Serve with sides, topping and maple syrup.  You can make them early and toast them to suit late-risers.

Best Gingerbread Ginger Snaps / Spice Cookies

PA-based spice cookie

Ivan’s Famous Spice Cookies, my childhood in a cookie

Thanksgivings of my childhood were spent with my maternal grandparents and almost always it meant a trip to Pennsylvania and Ivin’s Famous Spiced Wafers.   My cousins and I loved these cookies so much that even with all the food and family it always what we talked about in January.  “Why can’t we get more spiced wafers?”  They were addictive, and seasonal.  So we’d have to wait 11 months until our next fix. (They’re now available at Amazon.com)  When I started to bake, I never thought about making a spiced cookie, because I didn’t really know what it was.  Turns out, it’s pretty much a Ginger Snap cookie, also sometimes called a Molasses Cookie, depending on which of the bevy of spices (cinnamon, cloves, ginger, nutmeg) or sugars (white sugar, brown sugar, molasses) is most prominent in your flavor.  I tried lots of recipes, some with real ginger, candied ginger, or even pepper in them.   Most of them were not very good.   Then my friend Carolyn (last name withheld to protect her secret) shared with me her “go to” ginger snap recipe and I was hooked.  Most of the recipes I post here are versions of other people’s recipes where I felt they could be improved, and so I improved them.  This is one of those rare recipes where there is nothing I can do to add to this recipe.  It is just about the most perfect recipe there is.  Of course, I’m a little heavy-handed with the butter, molasses and white sugar, but otherwise, it’s pretty much as written below.    The original recipe calls for a frosting, which I determined was not necessary and actually detracted from the cookies.

Whenever I make these, they always disappear, whether I cook them perfectly, or too long.   They are just that good.   I do make sure to do a few things, though.

  1. I always use Kate’s unsalted butter.  You may have a favorite, but that’s mine.
  2. Get your one egg to room temperature.
  3. Freshly grate your nutmeg, and don’t use powdered nutmeg.
  4. Make sure your spices are fresh.  If you don’t know if the company that made your spices is still in business, it makes sense to go shopping.
  5. Chill your dough before you roll it, and keep the cookies small.  They better “crack” that way, which gives them a distinct and pleasing look.

 

 

gingerbread cookies, molasses cookies, spiced cookies

Ginger bread cookies– chilled first, then rolled and baked, have distinct ‘cracked’ look.

  • 1 cup sugar (for cookies), plus more for rolling
  • 3/4 cup butter, at room temperature
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons molasses
  • 2 cups flour, sifted
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. In a stand mixer, combine 1 cup granulated sugar with unsalted butter until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Mix in egg and molasses.

2. In a separate bowl, sift flour, baking soda, and spices. Incorporate by whisking well.

3. Add to butter/molasses mixture and mix only until blended.

4. Chill dough if possible (leads to a better ‘cracked’ look in my opinion)

5. Fill a shallow bowl with granulated sugar. Break off pieces of dough and roll into balls; roll balls in sugar. Place on parchment paper on a cookie sheet and bake about 9-10 minutes for soft, ‘ginger bread’ cookies and 11-13 minutes for ‘ginger snap’ cookies.   Let cookies set on a cooling rack (which is nearly impossible).   The dough freezes pretty well, but they generally don’t ever see a freezer.

Final note— I have experimented with using brown sugar and it doesn’t do anything for the cookies, so don’t bother.   I find blackstrap molasses is the best kind, and it should flow pretty freely from the bottle.

Hard Lemonade: The Best Tequila Drink for Non-Tequila Drinkers

Tequila, Beer and Lemon Drop Ingredients for this fantastic new cocktail

A tequila-beer cocktail for people who don’t like tequila or beer, made with only three ingredients.

#MARGARITAFAIL.

If you’ve ever had the pressure-filled situation of having twenty limes, a bottle of good tequila and a group of assembled guests waiting for delicious margaritas to come out of your kitchen (or bar) then the post is for you.

Because that’s happened to me. A lot.  And no matter what I do, I can’t get it right. The recipes I have tried, whether in books or web sites, fail to produce the same kind of yummy-give-me-more Margaritas that I have experienced at even the worst Mexican-themed bar or restaurant.

One of the reasons I started blogging in the first place was that through knowing people who run restaurants, I gradually understood that in many cases, you COULD NOT produce results like you had in the restaurants.  This is because you weren’t using the same ingredients: they knew secrets about ingredients that make things retain their color (Chinese restaurants use sugar on their greens); had access to certain things you don’t (who’s got a vat of MSG, for instance?), and they use things you wouldn’t think of (I was surprised to find out steakhouses generously coat their steaks with butter to finish them…is that why they’re so good?).

But I had a great experience with a tequila drink at Hungry Mother in Cambridge.   The drink is no longer on the menu, but at the time it was called a #57. It was so spectacular that I couldn’t stop thinking about it days after I had it.   Even when I knew the ingredients, I couldn’t replicate it, so I wrote to them asking for the recipe. To their great credit, they sent it to me, but even after following their instructions, it wasn’t as good as it was there.   Atmosphere to blame, perhaps?

The original recipe was in ounces and called for 3/4 oz of Becherovka, which is a mysterious drink you are unlikely to have in your liquor cabinet; it comes from the Czech Republic is green and has a flavor that is hard to describe.  Ultimately, I couldn’t make my drink taste that good with it, so I dropped it out, and you know what?   I found that by removing the Becherovka, I got it the way I wanted it.  A great tasting,  Hard Lemonade flavored and simple (three ingredients) drink loved by people who don’t like either tequila or beer! (I can provide references if you doubt me).

Robert’s #57

Over ice, pour the following.

  • 2 oz Patron Silver Tequila
  • 5 oz Stirrings Lemon Drop
  • Top with Harpoon UFO White

Mix vigorously and serve.  Now, you might want to play with the ratios to get it the way you like it, and certainly if you are going to make a pitcher, math will be involved.  But I promise you, you will be asked to make it over and over again!